Multiclassing Vs. Dual-Classing

Clayton Andrews is an example of multiclassing:

Clayton Andrews doesn’t fit the stereotype for pitchers. He keeps it loose before he pitches, he’s 5 feet, 6 inches tall, and he plays in the outfield on his off days.

“I don’t really have time to be just sitting around and not doing much,” the Milwaukee Brewers prospect said.

Although most baseball players are told to concentrate on one position when they reach high school, the left-handed Andrews was encouraged to express his two-way skill set throughout his career.

Rick Ankiel, on the other hand, is an example of dual-classing:

Ankiel was a pitcher with the Cardinals from 1999 until 2001, when he found himself unable to throw strikes consistently. After trying to regain his pitching form in the minor leagues and briefly returning to the majors in 2004, he switched to the outfield in early 2005. For two and a half years, he honed his skills as a hitter and fielder in the Cardinals’ minor-league system. He returned to the Cardinals on August 9, 2007.

I know, I’m an old school gamer. Kids these days only know multiclassing.